Board Gaming · Top Ten List

Top 25 Games: #20-16

Fun fact: there are 5 games on this list I’ve played exactly 1 time. Those first impressions were strong, and this portion of the list contains three of those games (with the other two appearing next week!). Several of the 1-play games came out higher on the rankings and I bumped them down a spot or two, giving preference to a game I’ve played more often in order to provide a better balance to how this list should be.

Like the previous list, these are all pretty equal in terms of quality of game. There is a small jump, I think, coming next week and then small jumps up after that. But really, this list could be fluid enough to where #20 could be #16 or even #24 at any given moment. You can be sure that if a game appears on this list today, I’d be willing to play it with minimal effort to convince me. Most of these games I’m craving more plays for, and would be the games I’d give strong consideration to pulling off the shelf to teach and play with someone.

#20 – Glass Road – Published by Mayfair Games/Lookout Spiele in 2013, Designed by Uwe Rosenberg, 1-4 Players.

This game blew me away. I thought I knew what an Uwe Rosenberg game was like. I had played Agricola, Caverna, and A Feast for Odin before I met this game. This is so radically different, mechanically, while also being nice and similar in a few areas to make it feel like Rosenberg. The action selection mechanism is brilliant, and the fact that you’re choosing 5 for the turn and playing 3…unless you can “follow” another player, is amazing. I love the resource wheel and how that mechanic changes and evolves as you take different resources. It was, after playing the game, easily my favorite game by Uwe Rosenberg. It was all I could think about for the rest of that game night, and I’m still thinking about it even now. I really need to play this one again, because it is so much fun.

#19 – Trajan – Published by Passport Game Studios in 2011, Designed by Stefan Feld, 2-4 Players.

I haven’t met a Feld game (yet) that I didn’t like, and this one stands atop the mountain as being the best of the Feld games I’ve played. There are still many more to try, but I think they will be hard-pressed to dethrone this one if I can get in some more plays. I really enjoy the personal mancala mechanic in here for your action selection. It presents some fun and interesting decisions and restrictions along the way. I love the time tracking mechanism in the game, and how it uses a different track for each player count. There appears to be many paths to victory out there on the board. My opponent, who taught me the game, claimed there was an unbeatable tactic and I managed to defeat him without following that path (it was close, though!). This was the hardest game out of all of these to place accurately on the list, as I feel like I’ve only begun to scratch the surface on this game.

#18 – Rococo – Published by Eggertspiele in 2013, Designed by Matthias Cramer, Louis Malz, and Stefan Malz. 2-5 Players.

The theme, admittedly, put me off from the game at first glance. I had seen it being played at my FLGS and was just like “meh” toward it. But then I found Heavy Cardboard and listened to their podcasts. While it was only as a reference point for the weight of a game, I kept hearing Edward mention this game on countless review episodes. I later found out it was a Golden Elephant nominee, which piqued my interest enough that it became a game I really wanted to try this year. And holy smokes, what a first impression this made! I’m in love with making suits and dresses now, and I made a special request for this one to be brought for my birthday gaming celebration. I really, really want a second play of this. It has a light deckbuilding element, but you get to select the cards from your deck that you put into your hand. But once they are used, they go into your discard and so you need to play the rest of your deck to get them back. There are three types of workers, and only certain ones can do the better actions, so managing that is critical. There is area control on the board to get bonus scoring. Recipe fulfillment. There are so many excellent mechanics at work here, and it just scratches all the right spots for me as a gamer. Sadly, it is out of print at the moment so it is hard to get a copy. But this is definitely worth seeking out.

#17 – Seasons – Published by Asmodee, designed by Regis Bonnessee. 2-4 Players.

This game suffers from the same problem as Terraforming Mars: if you don’t know the cards well, you’re at a disadvantage. Especially here, since you’re drafting all nine cards at the start of the game that you’re guaranteed to see/use over the course of the game. It seems strange that a card-driven game like this only gives you a guaranteed 9 cards, but it somehow works. There are ways to get more over the course of the game, and I like that you have to then take those 9 cards and break them down into groups of 3, dictating what year they will go into your hand. The dice are chunky and great to use. There is so much room for strong engines to be built with those cards, even when you get just 10-12 out on average. Every card feels overpowered in the right circumstances, which makes it fun. There is a fair number of take that cards, but you can easily play without adding those into the deck if that is something you don’t enjoy and you’ll still have a wonderful game experience. Unlike Terraforming Mars, this one never overstays its welcome on the table, making it a much more enjoyable experience overall every time it gets played. Every time I play this game I remember just how much I enjoy it, and this one benefitted from back-to-back plays right before I made the list. This one is fantastic, plays really well with two, has some great card drafting, strong engine building opportunities, interesting decisions almost every turn, turns move quickly, and involves some clever resource management along the way. It checks so many boxes that it can’t possibly miss this list.

#16 – Firefly: The Game – Published by Gale Force Nine, designed by Aaron Dill, John Kovaleski, and Sean Sweigart. 1-5 Players.

This game has fallen from my Top 10, and with good reason: the game hates me. It literally takes an active role in dealing my demise time and time again. Dead serious. Case in point: we were playing a 4-player game. I completed Goal #2 and had a sufficient crew to get Goal #3 finished and had about a 5 turn lead on the next two players. It took 2 extra turns to fly to Goal #3 due to Nav Card misfortune. Then I proceeded to go 0/5 on completing Goal #3, eventually losing to the next player to arrive who passed it on their first try. I almost always enjoy the game. As a Browncoat, this is a great immersion into the Firefly world. So many people I know love this game. I’ll rarely turn down a play of the game. But man, it is rough when everything goes wrong. This is that one game where things almost always go wrong for me. Some people might be turned off by the length, or the table space, or the setup/teardown time (that broken token crate is a godsend!), but if you are a fan of the show this is the game for you. Hauling cargo, completing jobs, just you and your crew in the Big Black of the ‘Verse. I’m really excited to try Firefly Adventures, as I think it might be the next great game using this IP, but this one will forever be a part of our collection. And if you ever want to win a game of this, just play against me. It’s a pretty sure thing that I’ll lose.

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Like last week, feel free to comment on the games listed, ones that surprised you, what you think you’ll see next week, or anything else of relevance! We’re one step closer to getting into the fun of that Top 10, but don’t overlook the other games being mentioned. These are all excellent games, and ones that are likely to remain (or finally enter) my collection for a long time.

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3 thoughts on “Top 25 Games: #20-16

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